avianawareness:

This has to be one of the top cute birdy pics.

avianawareness:

This has to be one of the top cute birdy pics.


shamitomita:

When you kill your friend in a video game and they can’t figure out who killed them

image


foodforbears:

eunnieboo:

if you have a pet and i’ve ever visited your house: i’m sorry

ME


leseanthomas:

shantellmartin:

Studio visit with UO. photos by Marisa Chavetz. Check out interview HERE.

Shantell Martin. My low-key artist crush. :-)


humancomputer:

If you need me I’ll be in the bath watching lava on my television

humancomputer:

If you need me I’ll be in the bath watching lava on my television



dynastylnoire:

I love my skin!

OMG THIS IS SO GREAT!


Hello! I know this isn't the loveliest of questions, but in your UN child morality post you said that one of the preventable diseases that 1/3 of children die from is diarrhea. I know diarrhea is disgusting and unpleasant and all, but how do you die from it?

fishingboatproceeds:

You die from diarrhea because of dehydration. Sometimes kids have diarrhea that requires IV hydration, for instance, and there’s very little of that available in rural areas in the developing world. There are much better rehydration solutions than there used to be, but the only good solution is 1. better sanitation so toilets don’t flow into water that gets used for drinking, and 2. clean water. 

When he was 2, my son had a diarrhea illness (campylobacter) that in the developing world could’ve proven fatal, but he was fine because he lives in the U.S. and we can go to CVS and buy Pedialyte, and if we couldn’t keep him hydrated, we would’ve taken him to the hospital. Bugs that cause childhood diarrhea are almost never fatal in the U.S., but more than half a million kids under five are going to die of diarrheal illnesses for want of clean waters, good toilets, and antibiotics that cost 20 cents per dose.

It’s infuriating. I saw a boy in Ethiopia who was extremely sick and possibly dying because of diarrhea, and it’s just so needless. He probably had rotavirus, and there’s a rotavirus vaccine, but it costs $2.50, which means many communities can’t provide it.

I am so angry about that boy’s needless suffering. I am so outraged about the needless deaths of millions of children every year. The progress in health outcomes in Ethiopia and many other countries in the developing world over the last 20 years is astounding. It’s unprecedented in human history. But we need to invest much more to get people in the developing world the basic resources they need to afford the 20-cent antibiotics and the $2.50 vaccines. 


thesufjanstevensmodel5000:

THE WORLD IS ABUNDANT


callmeoutis:

the worst thing about brokeback mountain is how they turned it into a joke here was a high profile drama with a-list actors and lgbt protagonists and then everybody just wrote it off and labeled it as “that gay cowboy movie” when they aren’t even gay cowboys they’re bisexual shepherds this is why we can’t have nice things


dominospizzadelivery:

are we talking about loading my blog or my life here, tumblr?

dominospizzadelivery:

are we talking about loading my blog or my life here, tumblr?


ninfia:

Do you ever have that moment when a kid is looking at you and you realize that they’re looking at you as a grown up? Then its like no child im a children too, dont. Im sorry my outward appearance confuses you.


gaydicks420:

the sims 4 announcements are so bleak and depressing out of context 


I’ll never understand why funding for the arts is the first thing to get cut. Music is Math. Theatre is English. Tech is science. Dance is physical education. The arts are everything.
Jay Armstrong Johnson (via opencurtains)

humansofnewyork:

"The right to protest is very limited in Tibet. But the Chinese laws allow for ethnic minorities to practice their traditions. So every Wednesday, to demonstrate solidarity, Tibetans all over the world express their culture. They speak Tibetan, eat at Tibetan restaurants, and wear traditional Tibetan clothing. It’s a form of silent protest." 
(Dharamshala, India)

humansofnewyork:

"The right to protest is very limited in Tibet. But the Chinese laws allow for ethnic minorities to practice their traditions. So every Wednesday, to demonstrate solidarity, Tibetans all over the world express their culture. They speak Tibetan, eat at Tibetan restaurants, and wear traditional Tibetan clothing. It’s a form of silent protest." 

(Dharamshala, India)


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